Gary Webb

Gary Webb ReporterPlease scroll down for videos.

Gary Webb, Michael Ruppert, Freeway Ricky Ross- Forgot About CIA

Michael Ruppert exposes CIA crack cocaine dealing funding wars world-wide… Gary Webb murdered for writing Dark Alliance… Freeway Rick Ross set up by the CIA. Illuminati government sponsored drug running…. Dark Alliance

Gary Webb was a Pulitzer prize-winning American investigative journalist

Gary Webb was a Pulitzer prize-winning American investigative journalist. Webb was best known for his 1996 “Dark Alliance” series of articles written for the San Jose Mercury News and later published as a book. Wikipedia
Born: August 31, 1955, Corona
Died: December 10, 2004, Sacramento

The cause of death was ruled a suicide from 2 gun shot wounds to the head.

You can listen to the entire program at http://www.theinformationnation.com/?p=3061

or download it for free at The Information Nation iTunes page.

Right click to download these pdf files.

A sad goodbye.PDF

America’s Debt to Journalist Gary Webb.pdf

ANYONE APOLOGIZING TO GARY WEBB.PDF

Analysis of C.I.A. Report On Its Involvement in Drug Trafficking.pdf

Cracked Report.PDF

Enduring Legacy – Exposing US gov’t protection of drug trafficking.PDF

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Gary Webb — Dark Alliance Interview Part II.pdf

Gary Webb remembered.PDF

The CIA-Contra Cocaine Connection.pdf

KillTheMessenger part 1.pdf

Killthemessenger part 2.pdf

Legacy of exposing gov’t protection of drug business.pdf

RENDER UNTO GARY WEBB.pdf

Rest in peace.pdf

Snow Job.pdf

GaryWebbSpeaks

The day the writing died.pdf

Trashed by the CIA’s Claque.pdf

Unembedded Reporter.pdf

We need him.pdf

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Investigative Reporter Gary Webb Who Linked CIA to Crack Sales Found Dead of Apparent Suicide

http://www.democracynow.org/2004/12/13/investigative_reporter_gary_webb_who_linked#transcript

Analysis of C.I.A. Report On Its Involvement in Drug Trafficking

Right click to download video. Or double click to view it.

http://ia902304.us.archive.org/26/items/dn2004-1213_vid/dn2004-1213_512kb.mp4

Gary Webb, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter who wrote a series of stories linking the CIA to crack cocaine trafficking in Los Angeles, is dead at age 49. We hear an 1998 interview with Gary Webb on Democracy Now! and we speak with his colleague, veteran investigative journalist Robert Parry. [includes rush transcript]

Gary Webb, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter who wrote a series of stories linking the CIA to crack cocaine trafficking in Los Angeles, is dead at age 49.

Webb was found Friday morning at his home in Sacramento County, dead of an apparent suicide. Moving-company workers called authorities after discovering a note posted on his front door that read, “Please do not enter. Call 911 and ask for an ambulance.” Webb died of a gunshot wound to the head, according to the Sacramento County coroner’s office. He is survived by two sons and a daughter.

Gary Webb’s 1996 series in the San Jose Mercury News titled “Dark Alliance” revealed that for the better part of a decade, a Bay Area drug ring sold tons of cocaine to Los Angeles street gangs and funneled millions in drug profits to the CIA-backed Nicaraguan Contras.

It provoked a fierce reaction from the media establishment, which denounced the series. Following the controversy, San Jose Mercury News executive editor demoted Webb within the paper. He resigned and pushed his investigation even further in his book “Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion.”

  • Robert Parry, veteran investigative journalist and author of the new book “Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq.” For years he worked as an investigative reporter for both the Associated Press and Newsweek magazine. His reporting led to the exposure of what is now known as the “Iran-Contra” scandal.
    – Read Robert Parry’s article: * “America’s Debt to Journalist Gary Webb”*

Past Democracy Now Coverage:

Transcript

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: we’re joined on the telephone now by Bob Parry, veteran investigative journalist, wrote for AP and Newsweek. His reporting led to the exposure of what’s now called the Iran-Contra scandal. His latest book is called Secrecy and Privilege: The Rise of the Bush Dynasty to Watergate and Iraq. Welcome to Democracy Now!

ROBERT PARRY: Hi, Amy.

AMY GOODMAN: I heard it from you this weekend that Gary Webb had died of an apparent suicide. Can you talk about Gary?

ROBERT PARRY: Well, I received a call Saturday from the Los Angeles Times asking if I could comment about Webb’s death. I went on and explained that the Country owes a huge debt to Gary Webb. What he did was revive a story that some of us at AP and then later Senator John Kerry looked into in the mid-1980s of how the Reagan-Bush Administration had financed the contra war in part by allowing the Contras engage in cocaine trafficking.

The evidence even in the mid 1980s was quite strong. Kerry did a fairly good investigation that was published in a report in 1989, but throughout this, the Washington Press Corps, the Washington Times, L.A. Times denigrated the story. The Reagan-Bush stories denied them by and large and that’s where the story was left. Kerry was ridiculed for being a conspiracy theorist for following the leads.

It was Gary Webb who revived that investigation in 1996 with his series in the San Jose Mercury News, and again, he was assaulted by these same news elements, the New York Times, the Washington Post, L.A. Times, and what he did was he provoked an internal investigation at justice, at the CIA, and those investigations while they — the press releases tended to be protective of the agencies, the information contained in the long reports was devastating. Essentially, the CIA admitted that it was involved with the Contras, who were actively participating in cocaine trafficking.

The CIA Inspector General said more than 50 Contras and Contra units were implicated in the cocaine trade, that the CIA knew about it in real time, that it hid the evidence, that it obstructed justice. All of these things were admitted by the CIA itself, by 1998, in response to Webb’s series.

The great tragedy, I suppose, of the personal tragedy and professional, is that despite these admissions, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the L.A. Times still refused to deal with the facts. It seemed almost like the editors had more of a stake in covering up the truth than the CIA did. So, Gary Webb’s career was allowed to be ruined.

The people who were involved in these — in protecting the CIA from those major papers, their careers blossomed. Jerry Seapost, the executive editor of the San Jose Mercury News, who sold out Webb and his series received an award from the Society of Professional Journalists for ethics because of what he did. So, it seemed like all of the people that did the wrong thing got the benefits, and Gary Webb and people who — including John Kerry, who did honorable work on this topic, received no benefits at all, and in fact were damaged.

AMY GOODMAN: Robert Parry, I wanted to play a clip of an interview that we did with Gary Webb on May 20, 1998. It was just after his book, Dark Alliance, was published. He talked about the media reaction to his investigation in the San Jose Mercury News. This is Gary Webb, 1998.

GARY WEBB: I tried to think of another example of uh, of where the mainstream press took off after a reporter, and the only one that I could think of was when the fellow wrote the confessional about who worked at the Wall Street Journal and had been a socialist all of these years, the hue and cry that went up over, my god, we actually let a socialist write our news for us. That’s the only other time that it’s been quite this intense.

AMY GOODMAN: Well, we now have your book, Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion. Do you expect a similar explosion from the press or will they deal with it by ignoring it?

GARY WEBB: That remains to be seen. It will be interesting. They couldn’t ignore it before because it was in the newspapers. Now, it’s in a different arena. Now, Amy, books routinely get ignored that sort of challenge the status quo and challenge common knowledge. It might be more difficult this time, because they had set up such a screaming contest earlier you know, this is not the series anymore. This is 600 pages of documentation, of interviews, and it’s going to be awful lard to dismiss it as, you know, unsubstantiated or not backed up or over hyped. The criticisms directed against the series because the information is there now. It’s laid out, and it’s — you know, I didn’t have to worry about some editor chopping off 15 paragraphs to make sure that the something else could sit on the page. I had the room to tell the story like it should have been told in the first place. Looking back on the whole thing, I think the problem we had in doing the series was that we were overly ambitious. We tried to tell a story in, you know, 10,000 or 12,000 words that really needed about 150,000 words to tell accurately and completely. And I don’t regret doing it. I’m glad we did, otherwise the thing would have never gotten out, but in doing the book, I realized how sort of crippled we were, just by the media and that we were trying to do it in. So, I think it will be interesting to see what the mainstream reaction to the book is, if there is one.

AMY GOODMAN: Gary, the way the mainstream press dealt with the black community responding the way they did, I found remarkably condescending.

GARY WEBB: That was offensive.

AMY GOODMAN: It was basically the attitude was, we understand why the people are so upset. Something terrible has happened to them, and it’s nice — it’s finally nice to be able to blame it on someone or something. So, we understand this kind of over response.

GARY WEBB: Right.

AMY GOODMAN: But its willingness to believe in conspiracy.

GARY WEBB: I don’t think there’s any other word but racist. I have never seen an entire race labeled as conspiracy theorists before. This was really — that’s when I thought they had really gone off the deep end, when they were trying to convince everybody that, well, you know, these black people, you know, they believe anything they’re told, which was when you boil it down, that’s exactly what the articles were saying. They tried to couch it in the scientific and sociological terms as why blacks distrust government. The bottom line is that these folks will believe anything. The Tom Tomorrow did an amazingly good cartoon when he had two New York Times reporters sitting around talking and they said, well, just because the United States government has a history of lying to the American public and there’s ten years of documented evidence with CIA involvement and drug trafficking, they actually think this might be true? The other guy goes, those Negros will believe anything. That was sort of the reaction in a very cut-down form of what these long wheezes in the Post and the New York Times did one the LA Times did one, the Washington Post did one on, oh you know — of course, black people are upset, because they all believe that, you know, Kentucky Fried Chicken will make you sterile, as if they have no reason whatsoever to believe that the United States government doesn’t have their best interests at heart at times. Look at the Tuskegee experiment and you can go on through history to explain why people of color would not trust the government. The other thing that these stories missed was that it wasn’t just black people that were upset by this thing. I mean, I was on a lot of right wing talk radio shows, and the people that called in to those shows were as mad or madder than the black audiences that I have — that I had addressed, because these were people who, I think, like me, believed what they were taught in school about the government. The government always has your best interests at heart. The government would never do anything to harm citizens. Drugs are evil, and they would never want to be involved in it. When they read the story and saw the documentation that we presented, they knew they had been lied to, for about ten years on the drug war thing. And they were really offended. It wasn’t that they grew up distrusting the government. It was the opposite, they grew up believing in it. Here was another example why their faith was misplaced, because American citizens had been sacrificed to fight this crazy war in Central America that really didn’t mean anything to anybody but the people at the CIA.

AMY GOODMAN: Gary Webb, in 1998, May 20, an interview we did when his book, Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion, first came out. This is Democracy Now! We’ll get a final comment from investigative reporter, Bob Parry, as you listen to Gary Webb, your thoughts, Bob?

ROBERT PARRY: Well, I think it’s quite sad that that voice has been silenced. It was tragic and sad that the mainstream press reacted as it did. As I said to the LA Times Saturday when they asked for my comments, which they did not publish, by the way, I said, you’re going to have a hard time dealing with this story, because the LA Times never even reported on the publication of the second volume of the CIA’s report.

It was that second volume that went through in great detail, really corroborating not just what Gary Webb had reported, but allegations and evidence that’s far, far worse than what was in the San Jose Mercury News series.

The far darker scandal that went far higher up than anyone thought. The CIA evidence tracks the Contra cocaine problem into the White House, Ronald Reagan’s White House.

It tracks it into the CIA directly. That’s what the evidence is. I’m putting up a story today on consortiumnews.com that will recount some of the evidence that’s lost to history. It’s just tragic that the LA Times and other major publications cannot face the truth.

AMY GOODMAN: On that note, I want to thank you for being with us. People can check the story out at consortiumnews.com. You can go to our website at democracynow.org where we will compile all of Gary Webb’s interviews. Gary Webb, the Pulitzer Prize winning reporter for the San Jose Mercury News date of an apparent suicide.

The Murder of Gary Webb Investigative Reporter and the Cover Up

published on Oct 26, 2013

Investigative Reporter Gary Webb Who Linked CIA to Crack Sales Found Dead of Apparent Suicide

Gary Webb, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter who wrote a series of stories linking the CIA to crack cocaine trafficking in Los Angeles, is dead at age 49. We hear an 1998 interview with Gary Webb on Democracy Now! and we speak with his colleague, veteran investigative journalist Robert Parry. [includes rush transcript]

Gary Webb, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter who wrote a series of stories linking the CIA to crack cocaine trafficking in Los Angeles, is dead at age 49.

Webb was found Friday morning at his home in Sacramento County, dead of an apparent suicide. Moving-company workers called authorities after discovering a note posted on his front door that read, “Please do not enter. Call 911 and ask for an ambulance.” Webb died of a gunshot wound to the head, according to the Sacramento County coroner’s office. He is survived by two sons and a daughter.

Gary Webb’s 1996 series in the San Jose Mercury News titled “Dark Alliance” revealed that for the better part of a decade, a Bay Area drug ring sold tons of cocaine to Los Angeles street gangs and funneled millions in drug profits to the CIA-backed Nicaraguan Contras.

It provoked a fierce reaction from the media establishment, which denounced the series. Following the controversy, San Jose Mercury News executive editor demoted Webb within the paper. He resigned and pushed his investigation even further in his book “Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion.”

Kill The Messenger: Mike Levine & Gary Webb – The Big White Lie + Dark Alliance= CIA drug cartel

Published on Aug 5, 2012

** Deep Cover is now available on Kindle here:http://goo.gl/DrfPM  **
—————————————-­———————————
Michael Levine joins Montel Williams with Gary Webb to discuss the CIA’s active sabotage against the American people, and their unwillingness to cooperate with open investigations

gary webb on cia drug trafficking Bing Videos

How Crack Funded a CIA War: Gary Webb Interview on the Contras and Ronald Reagan (1996)

Published on Sep 25, 2013

Facing increasing public scrutiny from the fallout after Webb’s “Dark Alliance” series, the CIA conducted its own internal investigations. Investigative journalist Robert Parry credits Webb for being responsible for the following government investigations into the Reagan-Bush administration’s conduct of the Contra war:
On December 10, 1996, Los Angeles County Sheriff Sherman Block announced the conclusion of his investigation into the issue, publishing a summary of the investigation at a press conference.

He announced at the press conference that “We have found no evidence that the government was involved in drug trafficking in South-Central.” Nevertheless, the report included information that supported some of the charges.

Charles Rappleye reported in the L.A. Weekly that Block’s “unequivocal statement is not backed up by the report itself, which raises many questions.”[20] Much of the LAPD investigation centered on allegations made in a postscript article to the newspaper’s “Dark Alliance” series.
On January 29, 1998, Hitz published Volume One of his internal investigation. This was the first of two CIA reports that eventually substantiated many of Webb’s claims about cocaine smugglers, the Nicaraguan contra movement, and their ability to freely operate without the threat of law enforcement.[21]
On March 16, 1998, Hitz admitted that the CIA had maintained relationships with companies and individuals the CIA knew were involved in the drug business. Hitz told the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence that “there are instances where CIA did not, in an expeditious or consistent fashion, cut off relationships with individuals supporting the Contra program who were alleged to have engaged in drug-trafficking activity or take action to resolve the allegations.”[22] Senator John Kerry reached similar conclusions a decade earlier in 1987. (See:[5])
On May 7, 1998, Rep. Maxine Waters, revealed a memorandum of understanding – item 24 between the CIA and the Justice Department from 1982, which was entered into the Congressional Record. This letter had freed the CIA from legally reporting drug smuggling by CIA assets, a provision that covered the Nicaraguan Contras and the Afghan rebels.[4]
On July 23, 1998, the Justice Department released a report by its Inspector General, Michael R. Bromwich. The Bromwich report claimed that the Reagan-Bush administration was aware of cocaine traffickers in the Contra movement and did nothing to stop the criminal activity.

The report also alleged a pattern of discarded leads and witnesses, sabotaged investigations, instances of the CIA working with drug traffickers, and the discouragement of DEA investigations into Contra-cocaine shipments.

The CIA’s refusal to share information about Contra drug trafficking with law-enforcement agencies was also documented. The Bromwich report corroborated Webb’s investigation into Norwin Meneses, a Nicaraguan drug smuggler.[23]
On October 8, 1998, CIA I.G. Hitz published Volume Two of his internal investigation. The report described how the Reagan-Bush administration had protected more than 50 Contras and other drug traffickers, and by so doing thwarted federal investigations into drug crimes.

Hitz published evidence that drug trafficking and money laundering had made its way into Reagan’s National Security Council where Oliver North oversaw the operations of the Contras.[5] According to the report, the Contra war took precedence over law enforcement.

To that end, the internal investigation revealed that the CIA routinely withheld evidence of Contra crimes from the Justice Department, Congress and even the analytical division of the CIA itself. Further, the report confirmed Webb’s claims regarding the origins and the relationship of Contra fundraising and drug trafficking.

The report also included information about CIA ties to other drug traffickers not discussed in the Webb series, including Moises Nunez and Ivan Gomez. More importantly, the internal CIA report documented a cover-up of evidence which had led to false intelligence assessments.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_Alliance

Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion – Gary Webb Interview (1998)

Gary Stephen Webb (August 31, 1955 — December 10, 2004) was a Pulitzer prize-winning American investigative journalist. Webb was best known for his 1996 “Dark Alliance” series of articles written for the San Jose Mercury News and later published as a book. In the three-part series, Webb investigated Nicaraguans linked to the CIA-backed Contras who had smuggled cocaine into the U.S. Their smuggled cocaine was distributed as crack cocaine in Los Angeles, with the profits funneled back to the Contras. Webb also alleged that this influx of Nicaraguan-supplied cocaine sparked, and significantly fueled, the widespread crack cocaine epidemic that swept through many U.S. cities during the 1980s. According to Webb, the CIA was aware of the cocaine transactions and the large shipments of drugs into the U.S. by Contra personnel. Webb charged that the Reagan administration shielded inner-city drug dealers from prosecution in order to raise money for the Contras, especially after Congress passed the Boland Amendment, which prohibited direct Contra funding.

Webb’s reporting generated fierce controversy, and the San Jose Mercury News backed away from the story, effectively ending Webb’s career as a mainstream media journalist. In 2004, Webb was found dead from two gunshot wounds to the head, which the coroner’s office judged a suicide. Though he was criticized and outcast from the mainstream journalism community, his reportage was eventually vindicated as many of his findings have since been validated: since Webb’s death, both the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune have defended his “Dark Alliance” series. Journalist George Sanchez states that “the CIA’s internal investigation by Inspector General Frederick Hitz vindicated much of Gary’s reporting and observes that despite the campaign against Webb, “the government eventually admitted to more than Gary had initially reported” over the years.

In 1999, Seven Stories Press published Webb’s Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion, complete with extensive source citations. The book received mixed reviews.

The book includes an account of a meeting between a pilot (who was making drug/arms runs between San Francisco and Costa Rica) with two Contra leaders who were also partners with the San Francisco-based Contra/drug smuggler Norwin Meneses. According to eyewitnesses, Ivan Gomez, identified by one of the Contras as a CIA agent, was allegedly present at the drug transactions. The pilot told Hitz that Gomez said he was there to “ensure that the profits from the cocaine went to the Contras and not into someone’s pocket.”

According to Webb, Judd Iverson, a San Francisco defense attorney who represented former Contra Julio Zavala, discovered compelling evidence demonstrating that “agents of the U.S. government were intricately involved in sanctioning cocaine trafficking to raise funds for Contra revolutionary activity.” Soon after, members of the Justice Department persuaded U.S. District Court Judge Robert Peckham to seal the documents in the case.

In 2013, it was announced that a movie would be produced called ”Kill the Messenger” with a Peter Landesman screenplay based on the Dark Alliance series and Nick Schou’s book, “Kill the Messenger.” The movie is to be directed by Michael Cuesta and will star Jeremy Renner as Webb.

Gary Webb on C.I.A. Trafficking of Cocaine

Uploaded on Oct 3, 2007

Gary Webb is the San Jose Mercury News journalist that was run out of his job and blacklisted from the industry for daring to report what he found out.

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